Trip to Kinabalu National Park (KNP)


Asian Brown Flycatcher (juvenile) found it searching for food on the floor.

Asian Brown Flycatcher (juvenile) front view

Asian Brown Flycatcher (Adult), this adult was seen feeding the juvenile

Temmick’s sunbird (female)
Always seen and captured the male at KNP and this is the first time, taken a nice picture of the female

Short-tailed Green Magpie.
This bird is the common resident at KNP, it makes loud calls while foraging.

Chestnut-hooded Laughing Thrush

Scarlet-Breasted Flowerpecker
Seen this bird many times, and this is the 1st time getting a proper shot.

Little Pied Flycatcher (male)

Bornean Whistler

Baya Weaver


The Baya Weaver (Ploceus philippinus) is a weaverbird found across South and Southeast Asia. Flocks of these birds are found in grasslands, cultivated areas, scrub and secondary growth and they are best known for their hanging retort shaped nests woven from leaves. These nest colonies are usually found on thorny trees or palm fronds and the nests are often built near water or hanging over water where predators cannot reach easily. They are widespread and common within their range but are prone to local, seasonal movements mainly in response to rain and food availability.

The above description is very closed to where we found the species in Borneo.  They we first sighted in Sandakan and now a new group is also found in the interior of Sabah, at Tenom town.  This birds were said to have migrated from Philippines.

The tree they are building the nests don’t seem to be thorny, but the tree is grown at the middle of wetland.

Following is posts of Close up shots about the male (has a yellow color plumage at forehead) and female Baya Weaver.

Male Weaver

Male Weaver

Female weaver

Female Weaver

The male weaver usually build a half completed nest and invite the female to inspect it.  If the female is satisfied with the nest, the male will then construct the entrance tunnel.   Following is a sequence of shots about how the female enter the nest.

    

Red-Bearded Bee-Eater


This bee-eater was taken last year.  It has a very unique call, like a growing alarm call and a series of deep hoarse descending call notes ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha.   More often, we can hear it’s call but can’t see it as it normally perches concealed and only flying out to snatch insects.  The male forehead is lilac, the female is red and juvenile green.

Asian Glossy Starling


Using Canon 5D Mk3, EF 100-400mm Lens, ISO160, F/9.0, 1/1600

This Asian Glossy Starling is one of the commonest resident at my residential area.  As the name suggest, the feather even is black in color,  it will look glossy green when light shine on them.

Given it’s size about 20cm,  most other small birds, like sunbird, flowerpecker, even burbul also afraid of them where feeding.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Asian Glossy Starling (Aplonis panayensis) is a species of starling in the Sturnidae family. It is found in Bangladesh, Brunei, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. There is also a huge number of this species inhabiting towns and cities, where they take refuge in abandoned buildings and trees. They often move in large groups and are considered one of the noisiest species of birds.

Brown-Throated Sunbird (Female)


Using Canon 5D Mk3, EF 100-400mm Lens, ISO1600, F/9.0, 1/125s

This female Brown-throated Sunbird can be seen regularly around my house, feeding on fruit (like the rape mango), insect, and nectar.  This mother has been very busy these days as she has 2 young chicks to feeds.

Didn’t managed to get a good shot on the male, which is more colorful.  Insert below is an image of the male. Copy taken from Wikipedia.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Brown-throated Sunbird (Anthreptes malacensis), also known as the Plain-throated Sunbird, is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family.

The Brown-throated Sunbird is a relatively large, heavy sunbird with a thick bill. Measuring some 14 centimetres (5.5 in) in length, it has a mass of 7.4–13.5 g (0.26–0.48 oz), with males averaging slightly larger than females.

Like most sunbirds, the male Brown-throated Sunbird is more colourful than the female. The male has iridescent green and purple upperparts with chestnut on the wing-coverts and scapulars; it is primarily yellow below. The female is olive-green above and yellowish below.

The Brown-throated Sunbird primarily feeds on nectar, but it will also take small fruits and berries. Juveniles are fed with insects.

Taken from Wikipedia.

Scarlet-Backed Flowerpecker


Using Canon 5D Mk3, EF 100-400mm Lens, ISO1600, F/9.0, 1/640

This bird was taken this morning at my backyard.  It flew to the mango tree and perch there for a while with enough time for me to take a clear shot on handheld.  This common resident is about 9 cm in size.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) is a species of passerine bird in the flowerpecker family Dicaeidae. Sexually dimorphic, the male has navy blue upperparts with a bright red streak down its back from its crown to its tail coverts, while the female and juvenile are predominantly olive green. It is found in subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and occasionally gardens in a number of countries throughout South and East Asia.

Kaamatan festival


Kaamatan (Harvest) festival, on 30-31 of May,  is a public holiday in Sabah.  Spent sometime at the KDCA to try out my Canon 5D Mk3.  Here are some of the pictures taken on 30May2012.

My favorite portrait shot

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Kaamatan festival is an annual event in the cultural life of the Kadazandusuns of Sabah since time immemorial. In its deepest sense, Kaamatan festival is a manifestation of Creator and Creation relationship, as well as Inter-Creations relationship. It embodies the principal acts of invocation of divinities, appeasing, purification and restoration, re-union of benevolent spirits, and thanksgiving to the Source of All. It is part of a complex wholesome Momolian religious system centered on the paddy rites of passage and the life cycle of Bambarayon– the in-dwelling spirit of paddy.

Appeasing is done in respect of Bambarayon, Deities, Divinities and Spirits, who may have been hurt by human wrongful, acts. Purification is performed in respect of human and spiritual needs for forgiveness followed by resolutions to make themselves worthy of the gifts of life from God. Restoration in necessary to ensure the health and well being of SUNIL, mankind and other spiritual beings. Re-union is realised in respect of human needs to be integrated in body, mind and spirit within the concept of the seven-in-one divinity in humanity, as well as re-union of Bambarayon with human Sunduan. Finally Thanksgiving is observed as befitting for all creations to express their gratitude and appreciation for the gifts of life (through Huminodun) and all life supportive system on earth that their Creator lovingly and generously gave them.

By Lai Jiun Loong Posted in Bird

Square-Tailed Drongo-Cuckoo


Image

Using Canon 5D Mk3, EF 300mm Lens, ISO4000, F/8, 1/200

 

Information from Wikipedia

Square-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo (Surniculus lugubris including brachyurus, musschenbroeki. This has white bars on vent and outer undertail, tail only notched with slightly flared tips. In flight a white wing-stripe is visible from below. This is found in South East Asia and is a summer visitor to the Himalayas from Kashmir to eastern Bangladesh. The calls are series of piercing sharp whistles rising in pitch but shrill and choppily delivered.