Asian Paradise Flycatcher (female)


Using Canon 5D Mk3, 800mm Lens.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Asian Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi) is a medium-sized passerine bird native to Asia. Males have elongated central tail feathers, and in some populations a black and rufous plumage while others have white plumage. Females are short-tailed with rufous wings and a black head. They feed on insects, which they capture in the air often below a densely canopied tree.

Adult Asian Paradise Flycatchers are 19–22 cm (7.5–8.7 in) long.

Asian Paradise Flycatchers are noisy birds uttering sharp skreek calls. They have short legs and sit very upright whilst perched prominently, like a shrike. They are insectivorous and hunt in flight in the understorey. In the afternoons they dive from perches to bathe in small pools of water.

The breeding season lasts from May to July. Being socially monogamous both male and female take part in nest-building, incubation, brooding and feeding of the young. The incubation period lasts 14 to 16 days and the nestling period 9 to 12 days. Three or four eggs are laid in a neat cup nest made with twigs and spider webs on the end of a low branch. The nest is sometimes built in the vicinity of a breeding pair of drongos, which keep predators away. Chicks hatch in about 21 to 23 days. A case of interspecific feeding has been noted with Paradise Flycatcher chicks fed by Oriental White-eyes.

Red-whiskered Bulbul


Using Canon 5D Mk3, 800mm Lens.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Red-whiskered Bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus) is a passerine bird found in Asia. It is a member of the bulbul family. It is a resident frugivore found mainly in tropical Asia. It has been introduced in many tropical areas of the world where populations have established themselves. It feeds on fruits and small insects and they conspicuously perch on trees and their calls are a loud three or four note call. The distinctive crest and the red-vent and whiskers makes them easy to identify. They are very common in hill forests and urban gardens within its range.

However, this bird believed an escape from cage of his owner.  Found at Karamunsing Complex area.  Looks like a loner as there was no other same species around the area. 

Trip to Kinabalu National Park (KNP)


Asian Brown Flycatcher (juvenile) found it searching for food on the floor.

Asian Brown Flycatcher (juvenile) front view

Asian Brown Flycatcher (Adult), this adult was seen feeding the juvenile

Temmick’s sunbird (female)
Always seen and captured the male at KNP and this is the first time, taken a nice picture of the female

Short-tailed Green Magpie.
This bird is the common resident at KNP, it makes loud calls while foraging.

Chestnut-hooded Laughing Thrush

Scarlet-Breasted Flowerpecker
Seen this bird many times, and this is the 1st time getting a proper shot.

Little Pied Flycatcher (male)

Bornean Whistler

Baya Weaver


The Baya Weaver (Ploceus philippinus) is a weaverbird found across South and Southeast Asia. Flocks of these birds are found in grasslands, cultivated areas, scrub and secondary growth and they are best known for their hanging retort shaped nests woven from leaves. These nest colonies are usually found on thorny trees or palm fronds and the nests are often built near water or hanging over water where predators cannot reach easily. They are widespread and common within their range but are prone to local, seasonal movements mainly in response to rain and food availability.

The above description is very closed to where we found the species in Borneo.  They we first sighted in Sandakan and now a new group is also found in the interior of Sabah, at Tenom town.  This birds were said to have migrated from Philippines.

The tree they are building the nests don’t seem to be thorny, but the tree is grown at the middle of wetland.

Following is posts of Close up shots about the male (has a yellow color plumage at forehead) and female Baya Weaver.

Male Weaver

Male Weaver

Female weaver

Female Weaver

The male weaver usually build a half completed nest and invite the female to inspect it.  If the female is satisfied with the nest, the male will then construct the entrance tunnel.   Following is a sequence of shots about how the female enter the nest.

    

Red-Bearded Bee-Eater


This bee-eater was taken last year.  It has a very unique call, like a growing alarm call and a series of deep hoarse descending call notes ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha.   More often, we can hear it’s call but can’t see it as it normally perches concealed and only flying out to snatch insects.  The male forehead is lilac, the female is red and juvenile green.

Macro


Using Canon 5D Mk3, 800mm Lens, ISO640, f/10, 1/400 -1/3Ev

This was actually a birding trip to Mt. Alab, a place which we have missed for sometime since the last visit.  The weather was cloudy and drizzling.  Birds are no where to be found.  While waiting, we saw this insect hanging on the barbed-wire. It’s body is about 3 inches long.  (Haha, shooting macro using a big lens, still my first time)…

Then we saw this green spider. In fact, there were many such spiders around the brushes.

Using Canon 5D Mk2, 100-400mm Lens, ISO400, f/8,1/500

Then another type of insects.

Using Canon 5D Mk2, ISO400, f/11, 1/125s

White-Breasted Waterhen


Using Canon 7D, 800mm Lens, ISO500, 1/320, f8

This waterhen is among the commonest one in Sabah, it can be seen at swamp, padi fields, and even at my backyard (near drain). They can be noisy when 2 or more meet and make loud and repetitive croaking calls.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The White-breasted Waterhen (Amaurornis phoenicurus) is a waterbird of the rail and crake family Rallidae that is widely distributed across South and Southeast Asia. They are dark slaty birds with a clean white face, breast and belly. They are somewhat bolder than most other rails and are often seen stepping slowly with their tail cocked upright in open marshes or even drains near busy roads.

They are largely crepuscular in activity and during the breeding season, just after the first rains, make loud and repetitive croaking calls.Adult White-breasted Waterhens have mainly dark grey upperparts and flanks, and a white face, neck and breast. The lower belly and undertail are cinnamon coloured. The body is flattened laterally to allow easier passage through the reeds or undergrowth. They have long toes, a short tail and a yellow bill and legs. Sexes are similar but females measure slightly smaller. Immature birds are much duller versions of the adults. The downy chicks are black, as with all rails.

Grey Heron


Using Canon 7D, 800mm Lens, ISO250, 1/1250, f10

This bird was photographed at wetland, Tuaran, while it was waiting for fish, I think. Its consider a rare winter migrant to the whole of Borneo until recently when it has become relatively common in the swamps and padi fields in NW Sabah.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea), is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

t is a large bird, standing up to 100 cm (39 in) tall and measuring 84–102 cm (33–40 in) long with a 155–195 cm (61–77 in) wingspan.[2] The body weight can range from 1.02–2.08 kg (2.2–4.6 lb). Its plumage is largely grey above, and off-white below. Adults have a white head with a broad black supercilium and slender crest, while immatures have a dull grey head. It has a powerful, pinkish-yellow bill, which is brighter in breeding adults. It has a slow flight, with its long neck retracted (S-shaped). This is characteristic of herons and bitterns, and distinguishes them from storks, cranes and spoonbills, which extend their necks. The call is a loud croaking “fraaank”. The Australian White-faced Heron is often incorrectly called Grey Heron. In Ireland the grey heron is often colloquially called ” crane “.