Crab-eating macaque


The crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is a cercopithecine primate native to Southeast Asia. It is also called the “long-tailed macaque”, and is referred to as the “cynomolgus monkey” in laboratories.

The scientific name of the crab-eating macaque is Macaca fascicularis. Macaca comes from the Portuguese word macaco, which was picked up from makaku, a Fiot (West African language) word (kaku means ‘monkey’ in Fiot). Fascicularis is Latin for ‘a small band or stripe’. Sir Thomas Raffles, who gave the animal its scientific name in 1821, did not specify what he meant by the use of this word, although it is presumed it had something to do with his observation of the animal’s colour.[3]

White-Breasted Waterhen


Using Canon 7D, 800mm Lens, ISO500, 1/320, f8

This waterhen is among the commonest one in Sabah, it can be seen at swamp, padi fields, and even at my backyard (near drain). They can be noisy when 2 or more meet and make loud and repetitive croaking calls.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The White-breasted Waterhen (Amaurornis phoenicurus) is a waterbird of the rail and crake family Rallidae that is widely distributed across South and Southeast Asia. They are dark slaty birds with a clean white face, breast and belly. They are somewhat bolder than most other rails and are often seen stepping slowly with their tail cocked upright in open marshes or even drains near busy roads.

They are largely crepuscular in activity and during the breeding season, just after the first rains, make loud and repetitive croaking calls.Adult White-breasted Waterhens have mainly dark grey upperparts and flanks, and a white face, neck and breast. The lower belly and undertail are cinnamon coloured. The body is flattened laterally to allow easier passage through the reeds or undergrowth. They have long toes, a short tail and a yellow bill and legs. Sexes are similar but females measure slightly smaller. Immature birds are much duller versions of the adults. The downy chicks are black, as with all rails.

Grey Heron


Using Canon 7D, 800mm Lens, ISO250, 1/1250, f10

This bird was photographed at wetland, Tuaran, while it was waiting for fish, I think. Its consider a rare winter migrant to the whole of Borneo until recently when it has become relatively common in the swamps and padi fields in NW Sabah.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea), is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

t is a large bird, standing up to 100 cm (39 in) tall and measuring 84–102 cm (33–40 in) long with a 155–195 cm (61–77 in) wingspan.[2] The body weight can range from 1.02–2.08 kg (2.2–4.6 lb). Its plumage is largely grey above, and off-white below. Adults have a white head with a broad black supercilium and slender crest, while immatures have a dull grey head. It has a powerful, pinkish-yellow bill, which is brighter in breeding adults. It has a slow flight, with its long neck retracted (S-shaped). This is characteristic of herons and bitterns, and distinguishes them from storks, cranes and spoonbills, which extend their necks. The call is a loud croaking “fraaank”. The Australian White-faced Heron is often incorrectly called Grey Heron. In Ireland the grey heron is often colloquially called ” crane “.

Javan Pond Heron


Using Canon 7D, 800mm Lens, ISO200, 1/500, f5.6

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Javan Pond Heron, Ardeola speciosa is a wading bird of the heron family , found in shallow fresh and salt-water wetlands in Southeast Asia. Its diet comprises insects, fish, and crabs.

The Javan Pond Heron is typically 45 cm long with white wings, a yellow bill with a black tip, yellow eyes and legs. Its overall colour is orange, slaty and white during mating season, and brown and flecked with white out of the mating season. The non-breeding plumage is similar to that of the Chinese and Indian Pond Herons and is virtually indistinguishable in the field. It breeds from June to September. It is migratory.

Yellow-Breasted Sunbird (female)


Using Canon 7D, EF100-400mm Lens, ISO1000, 1/400, F5.6

We found this sunbird while making a survey trip to Salut Seafood Restaurant.  It was displaying unusual behavior at the mirror of the cars at the parking lots.  It seems like wanting to demonstrate its beauty at the mirror or the bright reflective rear of the mirror.

According to the owner of Salut,  he has seen this behavior for sometime already.  We were very close in shooting its action and it didn’t seem to border about our pleasant.  After a while, it seem tired and rest on the reverse-mirror.

This is the commonest sunbird , found in gardons and cultivated areas. Young male has thin black stripe on throat and female has white side tail feathers, a useful distinction from female Brown-throated.

Ruddy-Breasted Crake


Using Canon 7D, 800mm Lens, ISO800, 1/200, f8.0

Photo taken at Paddy field Penampang on 10OCT2011.

The Ruddy-breasted Crake (Porzana fusca), or Ruddy Crake, is a waterbird in the rail and crake family Rallidae. Its breeding habitat is swamps and similar wet areas across south Asia from the Indian subcontinent east to south China, Japan and Indonesia.
The Ruddy-breasted Crake is about 22-23 cm long. The body is flattened laterally to allow easier passage through the reeds or undergrowth. It has long toes and a short tail. Coloring includes a pale brown back and chestnut head and underparts, with white barring on the flanks and undertail. The bill is yellowish, and the eyes, legs, and feet are red.The sexes are similar, but juveniles are dark brown with some white spotting.These birds probe in mud or shallow water and also pick up food by sight. They forage for shoots, berries and insects, as well as large snails, which they eat by using their bills to peck through the hard shell.Ruddy-breasted Crakes are territorial, but are quite secretive, hiding amongst grassy shrubs and bushes when disturbed.

 

Short-Tailed Green Magpie


Using Canon 7D, 300mm 2.8, ISO1600, 1/50, f3.5

Taken at Kinabalu Park, at 20SEP2011 with a couple from Singapore.  This We were attracted by its loud variety of harsh whistles and chattering call.  We saw 3 magpie flying around the same areas, seem like collecting something, after much exploring inner to the dense brushes, we discovered that they are actually in the process of building a nest, that’s why they have been flying back and fro the same spots with things at their mouth.

We have also seen this bird at Mt. Alab too, along Tambunan Road, which is about 1600m above sea level.