Orange-Breasted Trogon


This is my first time seeing this trogon and able to photograph it.  This looks like a juvenile.

Orange-breasted trogons generally have an olive-yellow head with feathers that are bristled and upright, chestnut upperparts, orange breast that changes to bright yellow on upper and lower portions, white bars on wing sections, and a blue bill. Males have a dull olive-yellowish head with a blue ring; rufous (reddish brown) upperparts and upper tail with paler rump (lower part of back); broad white bars on wing sections; and yellow (grey-based) upper breast with some white along the mid-line. Females have additional grey-brown on head and upperparts; pale buffy-brown rump, grey breast; and yellow lower underparts. Juveniles are similar to females, with young males having warmer brown upperparts.

Mengkabong Bridge, Tuaran


Many people, including myself see this bridge as one of the favorite spot for landscape especially to take the sunrise with Mt Kinabalu in the frame. As early as 4:30am, we drove from KK to the bridge at Tuaran, to park the car before reaching the bridge and walked towards the middle point of it and wait for the sunrise.

This round, it’s different, I’m standing at the opposite side, trying to capture the sunset with the bridge in the frame.  The above shot was a result of merging 3 separate shots together (as the bridge is too long, even with my 17mm lens).

Later, we cross the bridge and reach the opposite side of the river.  While the sun is setting below the horizon,  here is the shot,

When it’s getting darker, the street light is switched on and I tried the reflection shot.  Here and below

Just before leaving, I took another closer shot of the bridge.

Atkinson Clock Tower


Atkinson Clock Tower at Kota Kinabalu, Sabah was built in 1902 and completed in 1905 to commemorate the first District Officer of Jesselton, Mr Francis George Atkinson, who died of malaria at the age of 28.

A two-faced clock was presented by Atkinson’s mother Mary Edith, as a memorial to her son. Gazetted as a historical building by Sabah Museum in 1983, it was one of the three buildings still left standing after the war. The original clock was replaced in 1964.

It has been standing at the hill overlooking KK town for so many years. City people living in KK who come to KK will definitely pass-by this clock tower.  It strikes while I was photographing it…It was 6:00pm…

Special Sunset


This sunset is special as this is the first time seeing the sunset with the ray shooting up from the horizon.  I believed that was due to a clear sky after much rains in the past few days.  This ray appeared at almost half hour after the sun disappear from the horizon.  The upper part of the sky displayed the deep blue color too…
The sun can be seen very clearly while setting….

Passers by are admiring the sunset ….

Asian Paradise Flycatcher (female)


Using Canon 5D Mk3, 800mm Lens.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Asian Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi) is a medium-sized passerine bird native to Asia. Males have elongated central tail feathers, and in some populations a black and rufous plumage while others have white plumage. Females are short-tailed with rufous wings and a black head. They feed on insects, which they capture in the air often below a densely canopied tree.

Adult Asian Paradise Flycatchers are 19–22 cm (7.5–8.7 in) long.

Asian Paradise Flycatchers are noisy birds uttering sharp skreek calls. They have short legs and sit very upright whilst perched prominently, like a shrike. They are insectivorous and hunt in flight in the understorey. In the afternoons they dive from perches to bathe in small pools of water.

The breeding season lasts from May to July. Being socially monogamous both male and female take part in nest-building, incubation, brooding and feeding of the young. The incubation period lasts 14 to 16 days and the nestling period 9 to 12 days. Three or four eggs are laid in a neat cup nest made with twigs and spider webs on the end of a low branch. The nest is sometimes built in the vicinity of a breeding pair of drongos, which keep predators away. Chicks hatch in about 21 to 23 days. A case of interspecific feeding has been noted with Paradise Flycatcher chicks fed by Oriental White-eyes.

Red-whiskered Bulbul


Using Canon 5D Mk3, 800mm Lens.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Red-whiskered Bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus) is a passerine bird found in Asia. It is a member of the bulbul family. It is a resident frugivore found mainly in tropical Asia. It has been introduced in many tropical areas of the world where populations have established themselves. It feeds on fruits and small insects and they conspicuously perch on trees and their calls are a loud three or four note call. The distinctive crest and the red-vent and whiskers makes them easy to identify. They are very common in hill forests and urban gardens within its range.

However, this bird believed an escape from cage of his owner.  Found at Karamunsing Complex area.  Looks like a loner as there was no other same species around the area.